As of right now I’m sitting in Jeremy’s Grandma’s living room, looking out the window at a very snowy Montana. This is my first Christmas away from home, and while I am definitely going to miss my parents, it’s really great to be able to share it with Jeremy’s family. And having a white Christmas for the first time ever is pretty exciting, too. It just feels so festive every time we step outside, we went on a hike in the woods the first day we were here and the view took my breath away. Just evergreen trees coated with snow as far as the eye could see. I felt like I was standing in the middle of an Ansel Adams photograph. The only thing that will make it feel more Christmas-y around here is a little bit of eggnog, which I plan to make on Christmas day. Last week, however, Christiann and I got together and made a little trio of eggnog flavors, a tequila citrus eggnog, a hazelnut maple eggnog, and a spiced blackberry eggnog.
Eggnog Three Ways by Eva Kosmas Flores | Adventures in Cooking
An Adventures in Cooking Christmas by Eva Kosmas Flores

 

Foraged Fir Tip Tea DIY Gift by Eva Kosmas Flores | Adventures in Cooking

We did it because Carey and I had been talking about holiday foods on my podcast, and the subject of eggnog had come up. I couldn’t remember the last time I’d had homemade eggnog, and Carey started gushing about how tasty it is when it’s homemade, and how intrigued she was by Jeffrey Morgenthaler’s recipe for eggnog that involved tequila. So, being very diligent in my research, I went to Morgenthaler’s bar (Clyde Common) and ordered his classic eggnog. It was buttery, spiced, and oddly enough, I couldn’t detect the tequila in it at all, and would have guessed some sort of amaretto flavor was involved because of how buttery and nutty the flavor was. As it turns out, the key to that incredibly nutty amazing flavor is using freshly ground nutmeg. Do not use the pre-ground stuff for your homemade eggnog, trust me when I say that it is worth the extra effort to buy whole nutmeg and grate them fresh for your drink. The flavor difference is kiiiinda insane when it comes to making or breaking your eggnog recipe.

Honeyed Blackberry Eggnog by Eva Kosmas Flores
Above photo by Christiann Koepke

 

The ratio of eggs to milk and cream was interesting, too. I found some recipes that just called for yolks, and some that called for both yolks and whites. I personally like the recipes that call for both because I really like the silky mouthfeel that egg whites add to the texture of the drink. We found that four eggs to 16 ounces of whole milk and 8 ounces of cream was the perfect ratio. I tried Morgenthaler’s original eggnog recipe with 12 ounces of whole milk to 8 ounces of heavy cream and it was just a little too rich for me, but you are totally welcome to change up the ratio of cream to milk a bit depending on how rich you want it, as long as the total ounces of the two combined add up to 24 ounces in each of the recipes below (with more cream and less milk meaning a richer overall drink, and vice versa).
Hazelnut Maple Eggnog by Eva Kosmas Flores | Adventures in Cooking

 

I also ribboned the egg yolks for each of the eggnogs below. Ribboning egg yolks basically means that you whisk together the yolks and some sort of sugar or sweetener until the eggs turn pale yellow and flow in a smooth and steady stream (aka a ribbon) down from the whisk when you lift it out of the bowl. They turn this very pale white-ish yellow color because of the air that you’ve incorporated into them, and the reason why you do this is to make a more airy, silky texture, and also to ensure that the sugar is completely dissolved and you don’t get any granular sugar bits in your ‘nog. We experimented with different sweeteners (sugar, honey, and maple to be precise) and found that none worked better than others, they were all equally tasty in the eggnog. We tried to keep the sweetener levels in the below drinks at a medium level of sweetness, so if you prefer your eggnog more or less sweet you can feel free to tweak the sweetener amounts to taste.
Tequila Citrus Eggnog by Eva Kosmas Flores | Adventures in Cooking

 

Once the yolks were ribboned, we then emptied everything else in the recipe (egg whites, alcohol, spices, sweetener, milk, and cream) along with the ribboned egg yolks into a blender and blended it at medium speed for about 30 seconds until it was totally smooth. This also helped to beat air into the cream and egg whites, and left us with a little layer of bubbly froth on top. Once you pour it out of the blender, you can stir this froth layer back in to settle it a bit. The result of using the blender along with the pre-ribboning of the egg yolks was an incredibly silky, thick, velvety, and smooth eggnog. The texture was absolutely perfect, and the flavor of each one was incredible. I hope you enjoy them as much as I did, and I wish you all a very Merry Christmas!
Note: Consuming raw or undercooked eggs can result in food bourne illness, for your safety make sure to use properly refrigerated or stored eggs with very clean shells.
Tequila Citrus Eggnog by Eva Kosmas Flores | Adventures in Cooking

Tequila Citrus Eggnog

Course Drinks
Author Eva Kosmas Flores

Ingredients

  • 4 eggs separated
  • 2 ounces granulated sugar
  • 2 ounces light brown sugar
  • 16 ounces whole milk
  • 8 ounces heavy cream
  • 4 ounces tequila
  • 2 ounces cointreau or grand marinier
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg plus more for garnish
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons finely grated lemon zest plus more for garnish

Instructions

  1. Beat the yolks, granulated sugar, and brown sugar at high speed with a whisk attachment until the mixture is very pale and fluffy and thick and a steady ribbon of the mixture flows down from the whisk when it’s lifted from the bowl, about 3 to 4 minutes. Empty the egg yolk mixture into a blender, and add the milk, cream, tequila, cointreau, nutmeg, and lemon zest. Cover and blend at medium speed for 30 seconds. Stir in any froth on top of the mixture and empty into serving vessel. Garnish with a few pinches of nutmeg and lemon zest. Can be served immediately or chilled. Will keep in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks.
Hazelnut Maple Eggnog by Eva Kosmas Flores-2

Hazelnut Maple Eggnog

Course Drinks
Author Eva Kosmas Flores

Ingredients

  • 4 eggs
  • 1/3 cup plus 2 tablespoons maple syrup
  • 16 ounces whole milk
  • 8 ounces heavy cream
  • 3 ounces cognac
  • 2 ounces hazelnut liquor
  • 1 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg (plus more for garnish)
  • 1/2 teaspoon cloves
  • pinch of cocoa powder (optional for garnish)

Instructions

  1. Beat the yolks and maple syrup at high speed with a whisk attachment until the mixture is very pale and fluffy and thick and a steady ribbon of the mixture flows down from the whisk when it’s lifted from the bowl, about 3 to 4 minutes. Empty the egg yolk mixture into a blender, and add the milk, cream, cognac, hazelnut liquor, nutmeg, and cloves. Cover and blend at medium speed for 30 seconds. Stir in any froth on top of the mixture and empty into serving vessel. Garnish with a few pinches of nutmeg and cocoa powder. Can be served immediately or chilled. Will keep in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks.

Honeyed Blackberry Eggnog by Eva Kosmas Flores | Adventures in Cooking

Spiced Blackberry Eggnog

Course Drinks
Author Eva Kosmas Flores

Ingredients

  • 4 egg yolks separated
  • 1/3 cup plus 1 tablespoon honey
  • 16 ounces whole milk
  • 8 ounces heavy cream
  • 4 ounces spiced rum
  • 3 ounces blackberry liqueur
  • 1 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg plus more for garnish
  • 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon

Instructions

  1. Beat the yolks and honey at high speed with a whisk attachment until the mixture is very pale and fluffy and thick and a steady ribbon of the mixture flows down from the whisk when it’s lifted from the bowl, about 3 to 4 minutes. Empty the egg yolk mixture into a blender, and add the milk, cream, rum, blackberry liqueur, nutmeg, and cinnamon. Cover and blend at medium speed for 30 seconds. Stir in any froth on top of the mixture and empty into serving vessel. Garnish with a few pinches of nutmeg. Can be served immediately or chilled. Will keep in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks.

Eggnog Three Ways by Eva Kosmas Flores | Adventures in Cooking

 

Eggnog Three Ways by Eva Kosmas Flores | Adventures in Cooking

 

Eggnog Three Ways by Eva Kosmas Flores | Adventures in Cooking
Eggnog Three Ways by Eva Kosmas Flores | Adventures in Cooking
Eggnog Three Ways by Eva Kosmas Flores | Adventures in Cooking
Eggnog Three Ways by Eva Kosmas Flores | Adventures in Cooking
Above photo by Christiann Koepke
Eggnog Three Ways by Eva Kosmas Flores | Adventures in Cooking
Tequila Citrus Eggnog by Eva Kosmas Flores | Adventures in Cooking
Tequila Citrus Eggnog by Eva Kosmas Flores | Adventures in Cooking

 

Tequila Citrus Eggnog by Eva Kosmas Flores | Adventures in Cooking
Honeyed Blackberry Eggnog by Eva Kosmas Flores | Adventures in Cooking
Maple Hazelnut Eggnog by Eva Kosmas Flores | Adventures in Cooking
Maple Hazelnut Eggnog by Eva Kosmas Flores | Adventures in Cooking
Maple Hazelnut Eggnog by Eva Kosmas Flores | Adventures in Cooking

 

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